Tag Archives: Research and Play

Using Augmented Reality to visualise 2D sketches as 3D models

Planning maker projects, to extend learning opportunities with design for digital fabrication, has taken us back to tablets with new applications.

We’ve been looking to develop more ideas to support student projects over time, and to highlight maker education as another chance to combine digital literacy with physical computing across the curriculum.

Schools using 3D printers to design, prototype and showcase digital fabrication projects have linked previous projects into planning phases.

Just a couple of examples below, relating to environmental themed projects through physical computing (with Raspberry Pi) and now using the Quiver app to add support to visualise 2D sketches as 3D models.

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And so to 3D:

Of course the recent Amy Johnson Festival in Hull has led to more inspiration and a little Summer tinkering, too.

More to follow 🙂

Inspiring the next generation of digital makers in Hull

Background

We’re thrilled that the number of creative computing projects that we’re supporting in schools has increased again this year.

That also means that the hackspace at our Tech 4 Change conference extends as a showcase for teachers and children to share, collaborate and network through challenges.

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Themes and partners

We’re inviting teachers to join us in Hull, on Thursday 23 June, as we explore peer to peer learning projects and reflect on the impact of digital making activities across the curriculum.

  • Are you co-ordinating the computing curriculum in your school and looking to incorporate new ideas for Computer Science, IT or Digital Literacy?
  • Thinking about transition projects and progression of programming from KS2 to KS3?
  • Planning enrichment activities and involving parents and carers with STEM clubs and Code Club?
  • Are you an art or music specialist and looking to incorporate technology into your projects as a ‘STEM to STEAM’ activity?
  • Looking to explore the language and terminology of the curriculum and plan creative activities?
  • Would you like support to ensure that the requirements for the Computing programme of study are met in your school?
  • Want to discuss ways to underpin the curriculum with computational thinking?

Children from Years 5, 7 and 8 will be working through challenges as they explore creative and imaginative possibilities through physical computing and programming.

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They’ll be working with a team of passionate educators who’ll also be on hand to talk about your own plans for activities in school.  Here’s a taster of digital making activities and partners who’ll be with us in the hackspace on the day:

Making sense of sensors and programming possibilities with BBC micro:bit

We’re delighted as David Whale joins us and the children get hands-on with creative activities from the IET’s (Institute of Engineering and Technology) Faraday Challenge with micro:bit.

David joins us as a software developer, STEM Ambassador and volunteer with the IET, who has worked with the project from the early days to develop resources and liaise with schools.

We’ll be using the IET challenges and no doubt the children will add their individual creative twists with their iterations and plans!

  • Are you waiting in anticipation for a delivery of your students’ BBC micro:bit devices and want to talk to others about first projects?
  • Wondering about the potential of this micro:bit that’ll be given to this year’s Year 7 groups, and how to sustain their interests and ambitions?
  • Thinking about how to use the micro:bit to support STEM clubs and parental engagement activities through events back in school?
  • Or are you one of the schools that we’ve been supporting with your recent delivery of boxes and curriculum plans, and want to extend complexities and projects?

Join us with your own plans or questions to explore : )

Inspiring young makers on National Women in Engineering Day (#NWED)

It’s no surprise that we’ve chosen 23 June as the conference date, as we share new and ongoing inclusive and diverse projects to inspire digital makers in Hull.

#NWED is a celebration and a reminder of the projects and impact as we support school leaders and teachers to increase the participation of more girls in STEM fields and strategies to help close the gender gap.  Our own Ada Day follows on 30 June.

Immersive storytelling to support creativity in game making

We’ll be linking digital storytelling and literacy resources with the team from now>press>play to extend creative opportunities through programming.

We’re excited to be joined by Alice Lacey and Tom Owen, who will be facilitating activities and different kinds of learning experiences to use as a springboard into creative computing.  They’ll be engaging children through emotion, imagination and movement.

Join the auditory space journey that’ll lead to animation, game making and other digital activities using the resources from Code Club.

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Inspiring children through the Code Club network of after school clubs

If you’re looking to extend computing opportunities for children through your enrichment programme, then there’ll be lots of opportunities on the day to talk to Victoria Sauron about starting a Code Club in your school.  

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Victoria joins us at the North East and Yorkshire Coordinator for Code Club. As the children use the resources as examples of challenges available at the club sessions, you’ll be able to talk through how other schools have benefitted from the programme and what you can do to make it happen in your own school.

 

To join us on the day you’ll need to register for your free place, and select your workshops and time in the hackspace, on the link below.

Look forward to sharing those projects with you on the day!

 

Innovations and Game Making during National Careers Week

This week we’ve been supporting schools from the Hull Ready Hub through creative computing activities with Y5.

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What opportunities does computing offer towards future employment choices?

Well, we didn’t have a crystal ball at Malet Lambert, as 240 Y5 learners and their teachers got involved at the Careers Ambition and Inspiration Day.  But we did offer workshop activities focused on collaboration, game making and problem solving.
 

Part of activities to mark National Careers Week included learner engagement activities with an inventive focus.  Looking at a Raspberry Pi mini computer provided opportunities to work together to invent new solutions beyond the input and output conversations started.
 

The children also got hands-on with game making and development activities using Scratch as they worked with older peers too to create further iterations of their ideas.
 
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Y4 children take on the ‘Scribblebot Challenge’ at Malet Lambert School for #GEWmakeit

This week we supported Malet Lambert School who hosted Hull Ready Hub’s first Enterprise Festival during Global Entrepreneurship Week.

The event focused on Hull as a City of Culture, Enterprising People, STEM and Digital, so we planned and delivered an activity used through the Research and Play project.

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Hull Ready Hub Enterprise Festival

We challenged the visiting Y4 children (over 200 of them!) to ‘design and build a robot that’ll draw it’s own work of art’.

They collaborated through a Scribblebot Challenge and worked in pairs to explore computational thinking as they built their robot.  At the end of each 20 minute maker session we shared what each robot had created.

Children developed creative circuits and explored complexity using variables such as motors, switches and artistic additions to their design. Ice-lolly sticks became a favourite design addition!

The secret to success came with identifying ‘failures’ and using design iterations to improve their final robot creation. 

Final robot masterpiece were definite STEM to STEAM masterpieces.

Full photo gallery here

Exploring Hull 2017 with student voice during Global Entrepeneurship Week

We took Research and Play to the Guild Hall this week.

As part of Global Entrepreneurship Week we collaborated with the teams from major projects at Hull City Council and the City of Culture to challenge primary-aged children with STEM to STEAM learning activities.

Focusing on Hull 2017 as a smart city, we used smart technology to explore cultural icons and ‘fascinating fact finding’.

Using proximity sensors and circuits, created with electric paint and Bare Conductive’s Touchboard, children from primary schools across the city triggered sounds to find out more about their home city; past, present and future plans.

Fundamental to the day was the opportunity to capture student voice and actively involve children in activities using innovative tech.

Photo Gallery from the day here.

Research and Play: Breathing new life into Photosynthesis

Research and Play just got more creative as a set of Y10 Scientists from The Kingswood Academy join our project.

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                            Research and Play

The school have been exploring circuits with Bare Conductive’s electric paint and developing investigations with Raspberry Pi for over a year now, so we’re thrilled that this group can join us to share ideas at the Technology for Change conference on Tuesday 7th July.

They’ve already started to plan projects to bring along on the day and, along with their own teacher,  will invite others to join them and collaborate to develop further ideas in the live hackspace.  Activities will include:

  • Getting creative with capacitive touch using electric paint and Touchboard (ideas below)
  • Developing games and controlling devices using Makey Makey
  • Exploring and designing personalised ‘wearable tech’ using Codebug
  • Using Sonic Pi as a visualisation tool to code musical compositions with scientific data
  • Racing Cannybots as another way to explore contextual modelling
  • Collecting health data and looking at creative visualisation possibilities with the Young Pioneers
  • Getting creative (and possibly slightly mischievous) with Raspberry Pi and Pi-Cam project possibilities

Ideas to share as a taster before the conference?

This week the students have been finalising capacitive touch projects which are focused on creating resources and models to support revision.  Groups have each selected their own topic from their Y10 course.

One group has taken the electromagnetic spectrum as it’s stimulus; another space and planets.

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                   Revision notes as a starting point 

The group looking to add ‘modern learning’ (their words) to breath new life into Photosynthesis have been investigating ways to explain areas and share learning tips.

Their ideas have a waft of reminiscence from the BBC Adventure Game (circa 1986…eek) as they take a song, a plant and some nail varnish as core elements to design and create their model.

This time it’s not the BBC Microcomputer but a Touchboard that’s launching their interactive designs.  And the plant will need to be more sturdy than an aspidistra if it’s to hold up to paint and clips : )

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      An aspidistra, nail varnish and a tune

Did you know that the pilot show for Adventure Game included a planned activity using salt water to conduct electricity?  It was pulled.  How times change……

Hope you can join us to find out more about how Research and Play is supporting teachers across the curriculum through creative computing projects.  You can register here for your free ticket.

Tinker, Maker, Solder, Pi – Research & Play Week 2

In the ten short days since receiving their Inventors’ Kit boxes, our teachers in Hull have been sending in first drafts, schemes, ideas, and definite no-no’s from their initial Research and Play projects.

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Tinkering through Invention

They’ve also started to get feedback from colleagues and students back in school.  Sounds like there’ll be one SLT meeting going totally interactive with a KS3 raising attainment planning session, and anecdotes from others about enthusiasm and imaginative ideas coming from both peers and students alike.

How and where have they been tinkering?

  • One school decided to record questions from the existing ‘picture of the week’ display board and build on that current resource to show colleagues the impact and simplicity of the kit.  That image of Rio de Janeiro launched collaborative planning and there’s an extended list of cross-curricular projects for the Summer term.

Carnival time in Rio

  • Design & Technology with Healthy Eating – Pupils creating a collage showing either a food pyramid or ‘eat well’ plate and recording their voices to explain what each food group is and why it is essential, etc.
  • Cross-phase projects with partner primary schools – a computer science cross-transition project with Y 5 and Y6 children looking to creatively developing digital literacy.
  • Transition projects, with interactive location maps of the new secondary school environment, are a popular choice amongst our schools!
  • A whole school, cross-curricular project aimed at improving attainment at KS3 and demonstrating the inclusive and fun nature of computer science for all.
  • Computing with Design – A prototype Talking Mr T
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A prototype Mr T

  • History with Incredible Inventions – Pupils collaborating to design and create a timeline display with their invention of choice.  They’ll then design a picture on the timeline and save an audio recording to explain what and how they have researched this.
  • Design & Technology with Transport/Inventions – Pupils will design and construct a vehicle of their own (not using the board) and then work together to use the board to add sound/light effects to a class vehicle model.
  • Geography with volcanoes – A teaching centric project to record and animate onto a 3D object. This time it’ll be a volcano which opens up to show cross-section.
  • Introducing Ourselves – A group of sixth form students will be exploring the use of electric paint to create a display board about themselves in one of our special schools.
  • Art with Geography and landscapes – Building on the clay models of Great Britain that the pupils created last year, we’ll use the Touchboard to record key locations.  Pupils will then decide and select the most important parts of the project areas and it will be their voices again on the audio.  With a change of code, this’ll be the project to use with a proximity sensor.
  • A step further with enterprise board game activities currently enjoyed in school.

Next steps?

Projects are still developing as each school explores through computational thinking and across many parts of the curriculum. We’ll continue to build on that network of collaboration across the city, particularly as other school request to join us.

Some teachers have definite development requests to extend their knowledge through physical computing and will look towards projects using Raspberry Pi and Arduino – with or without a robot, and wearable or standalone tech inventions!  Others have expressed an interest to apply for one of the weather station projects from the Raspberry Pi Team.

For others, this introduction into creative computing across the curriculum has opened up so many possibilities:

  • A birdbox project with Raspberry Pi camera module
  • More cause & effect activities using the paint and Dot Board with Raspberry Pi
  • Game-making activities through Scratch across the curriculum
  • Ideas to develop parental engagement through computing.
  • Changing the code on the Touchboard to look at the effects of the proximity sensor and midi keyboard options.

That’s the start of the beginning of some plans to build and develop.

There’ll be other projects this term, but for now watch this space.  And shout with any questions 🙂