Tag Archives: eBooks

Sharing teaching ideas, strategies and evolving pedagogies at Tech 4 Change

The programme of workshops at this year’s Tech 4 Change conference was guided by school and teacher priorities added to CPD plans over the year.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

What did teachers hope to gain from the event?

  • ‘New ideas regarding technology and updates regarding e-safety’
  • ‘Tips on implementing cloud technologies’
  • ‘Keep up-to-date with any new initiatives and learn some best practice techniques used in other settings’
  • ‘An insight as to what technology is doing to contribute to the learner experience’

DSCF0329

Feedback from the day

  • ‘Especially liked the now press play and the Tweendykes practical sessions showing how to incorporate a range of technology for cross curricular usage’
  • ‘Loved the Lego workshop!’
  • ‘The keynotes were brilliant!’
  • ‘Good chance to meet with other colleagues. Also identified some useful ideas and resources for use at my school’
  • ‘Like the variety of workshops’
  • ‘Really enjoyed the workshops’
  • ‘The online safety workshop was brilliant’

The theme for this year was inspiring, preparing and empowering students to be successful and responsible citizens in this technology-rich modern world.

Practical sessions gave opportunities to share ideas, strategies, available support and build on the schools’ network to explore how technology has positively impacted on learning.

Here’s an overview:

Innovative technologies to support the wider curriculum

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Kath Oliver, and a group of students from Tweendykes School, delivered a practical session with Russell looking at how technologies have extended the range of learning opportunities in school.

Examples of projects and resources explored by teachers included Google Cardboard, electric paint with Touchboard, physical computing devices, a barcode scanner and 3D printing.

Making the KS 1&2 computing curriculum clear: Unplugged with LEGO

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Tom Radge, an Assistant Head from Ganton School and CAS Master Teacher, joined us to share his ideas for teaching unplugged computing.

This hands on workshop gave teachers the chance to explore the use of LEGO and constructionism to deliver computing activities in school.

Constructionism starts with the belief that children learn best when they experience things first-hand and within a meaningful context. LEGO allows us to do this, and the session generated lots of practical ideas and reflections from the group.

Embedding a culture of literacy across the curriculum

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

This session from Bron Duly explored how the use of ebooks has helped children to make significant progress with their reading and get the most reluctant readers to enjoy reading more, according to a study published by the National Literacy Trust in December 2015.

With a local focus, Bron also explored the findings from the reading intervention project with online libraries across a group of primary schools in Hull.

Making sense of sensors and programming possibilities: Hands-on with the BBC micro:bit

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

David Ames, Associate Tutor in Computing/ICT at Edge Hill and CAS Master Teacher, joined us to share practical hints and resources with teachers.

Some of our schools have already received the devices and students have been given tinkering homework tasks since half-term.  Other teachers are planning to use micro:bit with Year 7 students in the forthcoming weeks and were keen to share ideas.

Organised learning and connected students with Apple’s iTunes U and Showbie

Neil’s practical session used iTunes U to model an environment for students to engage, collaborate and share.

Teachers were able to explore how iTunes U supports them to create structured assignments and single lesson materials for students and how learners submit their work for assessment.

Immersive storytelling: Engaging primary age children through emotion, imagination and movement

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Alice Lacey and Tom Owen, from now>press>play, took teachers on creative journeys to other worlds to explore immersive learning through sound, story and movement.

Earlier in the makerspace, the children had been taken back to Ancient Egypt as a catalyst for creativity to extend programming and writing possibilities.  This time the adults wore the infamous pink headphones 🙂

Collaborating within and beyond the classroom: A practical session learning as a learner through Google Classroom

DSCF0569

Google Classroom can significantly transform the way that teachers and students use technology in the classroom and beyond the school walls.

In this workshop Russell and Mark explored how real-time editing of documents by multiple people can support learning, along with the seamless delivery of homework.

Making Online Safety a Priority

DSCF0428

A fundamental part of our CPD programme has been to prioritise online safety and support schools to ensure that their knowledge, systems and protocols are in place to safeguard students and staff.

Kat Howard’s thought provoking workshop looked at the journey to outstanding, and sustaining it, amidst new and continually changing challenges and requirements.

The introduction of Ofsted’s latest safeguarding measures and the DfE’s Prevent Duty on schools as part of the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015 were topical discussion points.

Turning a digital vision into reality through change management

DSCF0323

How do you move an entire school to new ways of working using Google Apps for Education?

After over 25 years of at the chalkface, Mark House is not perhaps the most obvious flag bearer for technology in education.

Through a few twists and turns, Mark became the unlikely strategic lead in his school’s desire to move to new ways of working. He joined us in Hull to reveal the bumps, bruises and near misses that took place along the way, and to share the real impact that whole institution change can make.

 

Embedding a culture of literacy across the curriculum

Background

It was more than an educational visit to Bletchley Park that came out of last year’s Tech 4 Change conference.

The event sparked numerous projects and collaborations including a reading intervention programme supporting over 200 learners across 8 centres in Hull.

Once discussions around the positive use of ebooks to support literacy programmes in schools developed, it became apparent that a project in the city could be launched to extend current interventions.  The National Literacy Trust project was a catalyst to design a programme to extend readers in Hull.

NLT

Project overview

Through the Primary Headteachers’ forum, a project focused on progression of reading with children in Year 5 has emerged.

Each school has populated their own online library of ebooks with free titles alongside the ability to populate with a range of books appropriate to their children’s ability, interests and current reading schemes.  For some that has seen an extended range of Accelerated Reader titles added to their online library and for others, using pupil voice throughout decision making, a common theme has been more Diary of a Wimpy Kid or titles from David Walliams.

We’re also thrilled to see the head and teachers from The Boulevard Centre collaborating through the programme with their own project, supporting readers whose ages are lower and higher than Y5, and individual needs and interventions.

Measuring impact

Whilst the focus of the project is to report back on the impact with Year 5 children, schools have been encouraged and supported to utilise the books and resources with other classes and groups.  They’ll be able to continue to use their library of books after this first evaluation study is over.

Data collection such as attitudinal surveys and reading ages, taken at project launch and finish, will be collated as evaluation tools alongside anecdotal comments from teachers and readers.

We’ll share initial findings at this year’s Tech 4 Change conference in Hull on 23 June.

 

book devices

Implementation of an online library resource

Most schools are utilising tablet devices for children to access their ebooks, alongside laptop and desktop computers.  The latter have been used in a couple of schools when children have requested reading time once their computing activity has been finished!

There’s a definite mix of teachers who have previously used ebooks as part of their guided reading programme and those who are evaluating for the first time.  From the beginning of the project has always been the intention to explore progression of reading through ebooks and also to maintain a healthy balance with physical books.

Most projects have also added opportunities for pupil voice in their library decision making process. Teachers have chosen to include the ‘recommend’ option for children to suggest reading books to be added to their school library and individual collection.

Timetabling 

Reading intervention time with ebooks differs for each group, let alone each school.  Some examples:

  1. A dedicated one hour each week for all Year 5 children
  2. Weekly guided reading session using ebooks (other times continue with physical books)
  3. Lunchtime reading clubs
  4. Daily intervention groups
  5. Supporting out of school access
  6. Reading opportunities within other learning times

Tools and reporting

Tools within the library have supported teachers to create a bespoke range of books suitable for their learners’ needs.

reading and interest age

Filtering by genre, interest level and reading age has been beneficial for one school who have been extending reading opportunities for above average girls in their project.  In another school, the tools have enabled bespoke packs to be created for children with EAL with other examples to share at a later date.

ar

Reporting capabilities have also highlighted progress and time spent reading including number of books, page turns, interactions etc.  Of course this has flagged up continued reading for some children at home during evenings, weekends and holidays and perhaps the most requested and popular titles in the library.  For individuals, their progress is available for teachers to share and trends have been highlighted.

Individual learner needs and feedback

We’re starting to hear about comments and experience from children’s reading sessions and of course building up a bank of evidence and quotes through the surveys.

Requests from children for a particular genre of book or author are highlighted to teachers through the reporting tools and their comments about using ebooks for one of their guided reading sessions have been positive.

At one school there’s been an excitement at using mobile devices to access their books as they’ve taken pleasure in answering questions related to their assessment focus.  Guided reading sessions have given opportunities for challenges to further interact with the text, which the children have particularly enjoyed.

For a couple of readers at one school their enjoyment of reading, time spent reading and confidence have all increased as they’re making progress.  This has led to requests for ‘more challenging books, please’ which was quickly acknowledge and actioned by their reading intervention teacher!

For one child with general learning difficulties, previous use of an iPad for learning activities has proved difficult.  During this ebook project he’s gaining positive experiences through reading with a peer.

Early lessons learnt?

Further interventions have been needed for some children in the project, either supporting their learning, reading behaviours or access to the online libraries.

Reports have flagged up the small number of children who ‘test out’ the monitoring system with apparent mammoth reading activity only to find that they’ve become ‘page flickers’.  Soon resolved!

For one child with autism, he’s found connecting an iPad to his medium for reading exceptionally difficult. Comfortable using a tablet for learning activities, sees the iPad as a device for quizzes, games, research and projects.

What next?

The project will continue over the Summer term, with schools able to extend their library to more children, and particularly as the new academic year starts in September.  There’s no switch off date.

Some of the teachers involved in the project will be sharing their experiences and reporting on reading progress of their children at the Tech 4 Change conference on 23 June.

If you’d like to learn more about using ebooks to embed a culture of literacy across the curriculum, join us on the day by registering for a free of charge place on the link below.

Tech 4 Change

 

iPad Academy Part One. What happens next?

Wow!  Today we launched iPad Academy in Hull, with teachers from schools across the city collaborating to focus on changing pedagogy when implementing iPad in school.

The fundamental aim was to create a teaching network to facilitate innovation and creativity with iPad, with a priority to improve the quality of teaching & learning.  

Everybody that attended said that they’d recommend the session to colleagues, so we’ll continue with this format with plenty of time to share ideas and plan collectively, and also with the opportunity for practical activities.

What did teachers like and what will continue?

  1. “Quality of content and well thought out material designed to enhance T&L”
  2. “Being able to discuss with other staff what they do with iPad”
  3. “Interactivity of the session”
  4. “Ideas to try!”
  5. “Talking to other schools and hearing (and seeing) what they do with Ebooks”

The first change for some of us was to learn that Apple’s collective term (plural) for a set of these devices should be iPad and not iPads.  Just needed to flag that up as we’re focussing on literacy!

What do our teachers hope to achieve and learn from an iPad Academy for the city?

We’ve started to use ‘Padlet’ as a tool to share online at Padlet for iPad Academy in Hull. Here’s a taster of expectations from some teachers below:

  1. “I want to consolidate learning.”
  2. “I want to use iPad more effectively to improve the quality of T&L.”
  3. “I want to engage our students with literacy. Those students who say they don’t like reading or writing but do LOVE iPad!”
  4. “I want to embed iPad rather than substitute a laptop for them.”

Resources for iPad Academy in Hull

Teachers appreciated the online shared materials that will be expanded as the project moves through the year.  We’re also going to look at a request for a ‘Teacher Toolkit’ to support staff with planning and implementing iPad and looking to use particular tools, apps or approaches for the first time.

Here are a selection of comments and questions about ongoing support and CPD opportunities:

  1. How can we support a teacher looking to use the Flipped Learning approach with a group of Y7 students and evaluate it’s impact on their learning?
  2. What can be shared from colleagues who have already used Flipped Learning?
  3. What’s the process for a teacher using a class set of online textbooks through RM Books?
  4. How about a project to create and publish an eBook for a particular audience?
  5. Can we look at transition activities and parental engagement?

These are a couple of examples of what can be included in CPD plans during this next half term, alongside supporting a school’s strategy to deliver their vision for learning.  In the meantime, please click on the images below to view or download the resources shared during today’s session.

Here’s Neil’s presentation on Slideshare:

Slideshare Image

Visit the Academy’s resources with Pearltrees here:

Pearltrees

Look out for future Tweets here:

Twitter

What next?

Here are a selection of comments, but we’ll review all of the suggestions, particularly from those teachers who couldn’t attend, and publish the next agenda shortly.  Any more ideas?!

  1. “More 1:1 practice”
  2. “Maths stuff!”
  3. “Longer time for workshop sessions”
  4. “Focus on sharing work and printing”
  5. “Shared planning to encourage independent learning”
  6. “More practical ideas with Apple TV”

Thanks again to the teachers from Kingswood Academy who kindly agreed to host the session and made us feel so welcome 🙂

Neil iPad Academy

See you on 1st April at Winifred Holtby.  Agenda to follow!