Tag Archives: Computing Curriculum

Using Augmented Reality to visualise 2D sketches as 3D models

Planning maker projects, to extend learning opportunities with design for digital fabrication, has taken us back to tablets with new applications.

We’ve been looking to develop more ideas to support student projects over time, and to highlight maker education as another chance to combine digital literacy with physical computing across the curriculum.

Schools using 3D printers to design, prototype and showcase digital fabrication projects have linked previous projects into planning phases.

Just a couple of examples below, relating to environmental themed projects through physical computing (with Raspberry Pi) and now using the Quiver app to add support to visualise 2D sketches as 3D models.

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And so to 3D:

Of course the recent Amy Johnson Festival in Hull has led to more inspiration and a little Summer tinkering, too.

More to follow 🙂

Makerspace at Tech4Change: Young digital makers and teachers collaborate

Teachers asked us to include another project space at this year’s conference, so we expanded the range of activities and age range of children joining us.

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A group of Learning Innovators from Spring Cottage Primary and Malet Lambert schools came along with their experiences of mixed aged collaborations this year, through wearable technology challenges, alongside their own school based activities.

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Challenges to inspire this next generation of Y5, 7 & 8 innovators included using the Faraday Project resources from the IET (Institute of Engineering and Technology). Children worked in pairs and teams to plan their own projects and determine levels of complexity.

None of the students had seen a BBC micro:bit before, let alone coded one. They quickly transferred what they’d learnt from previous projects to tackle ambitious group challenges under guidance from Dave Ames.

Using the micro:bit with these resources was a perfect match to engage and excite the group on National Women in Engineering Day  (#NWED2016).

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The theme for activities in the makerspace centred around a book by Julia Jarman.  The Time Travelling Cat and The Egyptian Goddess became a catalyst for creativity and to extend programming, digital fabrication and writing opportunities.

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Linking digital storytelling and literacy resources, the team from now>press>play took the children back to Ancient Eqypt to explore creativity through sound, story and movement.

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That led to animations and game-making with Scratch, either using resources from Code Club or remixing shared code.

Some children got hands-on, learning by doing, with digital fabrication tools.

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Working with Paul, and using Egyptian themed artefacts with the Sprout, they developed 3D creative imagination to explore the design-thinking process.

They started to show the connection between planning and 3d modelling with a computer to reach a prototype stage, and then make further iterations. And said they enjoyed working on those design changes 🙂

Ada Lovelace Day in Hull: Inspiring and engaging young people to increase participation of girls in computing

Teachers and Y7 students joined us from across the city to collaborate on creative physical computing projects and explore careers in STEM.

Aims of the day:

  • To support the participation of more girls in computing and strategies to help close the gender gap in STEM fields.
  • To challenge and influence perceptions of computing with positive role models
  • To share creative opportunities through physical computing as a wearable tech STEAM projects (art, textiles, design etc.)
  • To support teachers with networking and collaborative opportunities

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We used the WISE Campaign’s People Like Me resources to explore personal strengths and aspirations and also to find out more about careers in STEM.

Language considerations opened up conversations and  thoughts on future possibilities, and for some adults a reassurance of their career choice in an instructor/teacher role.  Yes, we were all involved 🙂

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Students worked in pairs to start their projects through design-thinking, which meant sketching ideas and thoughts after initially coding and downloading a starter activity onto Codebugs.

The project brief was theirs to personalise and consider their own purpose and levels of complexity.  Support with ideas came with peer coaching and an array of resources to invent a wearable technology solution to their real life problem – or purpose.

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Lights, sound, tunes and messages were coded and then incorporated into their digital making projects.  Several iterations later and they were able to share their inventions, models and textile-based creations.

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Feedback from the students?

  • Computing activities can be complex and frustrating. But once you understand how to control it, it will become easier.
  • I found the part when we designed our inventions on the piece of paper exciting because it required us to discuss and think about what we were going to do.
  • I liked sewing the project together because it was challenging.
  • I found the designing exciting because we used our own ideas.
  • I liked making the project because it was fun and creative.
  • I liked exploring different ideas of computer science.
  • The activity was hard and frustrating at times but when you finally complete the activity, you feel really good and satisfied.
  • Making the project was interesting.

And how did they describe the digital making activities?

  • Fun and interesting!
  • Hard, different, fun and I would do it again
  • Wasn’t as I expected
  • I think that it was challenging and was fun
  • Interesting yet difficult
  • I found it tricky on some things but near the end it was fun and easy because I like to be creative and make/build things

Thanks to Winifred Holtby Academy, who became part of the planning cycle from the beginning, and sparked more interest in students to form future Lego challenge teams.

Inspiring the next generation of digital makers in Hull

Background

We’re thrilled that the number of creative computing projects that we’re supporting in schools has increased again this year.

That also means that the hackspace at our Tech 4 Change conference extends as a showcase for teachers and children to share, collaborate and network through challenges.

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Themes and partners

We’re inviting teachers to join us in Hull, on Thursday 23 June, as we explore peer to peer learning projects and reflect on the impact of digital making activities across the curriculum.

  • Are you co-ordinating the computing curriculum in your school and looking to incorporate new ideas for Computer Science, IT or Digital Literacy?
  • Thinking about transition projects and progression of programming from KS2 to KS3?
  • Planning enrichment activities and involving parents and carers with STEM clubs and Code Club?
  • Are you an art or music specialist and looking to incorporate technology into your projects as a ‘STEM to STEAM’ activity?
  • Looking to explore the language and terminology of the curriculum and plan creative activities?
  • Would you like support to ensure that the requirements for the Computing programme of study are met in your school?
  • Want to discuss ways to underpin the curriculum with computational thinking?

Children from Years 5, 7 and 8 will be working through challenges as they explore creative and imaginative possibilities through physical computing and programming.

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They’ll be working with a team of passionate educators who’ll also be on hand to talk about your own plans for activities in school.  Here’s a taster of digital making activities and partners who’ll be with us in the hackspace on the day:

Making sense of sensors and programming possibilities with BBC micro:bit

We’re delighted as David Whale joins us and the children get hands-on with creative activities from the IET’s (Institute of Engineering and Technology) Faraday Challenge with micro:bit.

David joins us as a software developer, STEM Ambassador and volunteer with the IET, who has worked with the project from the early days to develop resources and liaise with schools.

We’ll be using the IET challenges and no doubt the children will add their individual creative twists with their iterations and plans!

  • Are you waiting in anticipation for a delivery of your students’ BBC micro:bit devices and want to talk to others about first projects?
  • Wondering about the potential of this micro:bit that’ll be given to this year’s Year 7 groups, and how to sustain their interests and ambitions?
  • Thinking about how to use the micro:bit to support STEM clubs and parental engagement activities through events back in school?
  • Or are you one of the schools that we’ve been supporting with your recent delivery of boxes and curriculum plans, and want to extend complexities and projects?

Join us with your own plans or questions to explore : )

Inspiring young makers on National Women in Engineering Day (#NWED)

It’s no surprise that we’ve chosen 23 June as the conference date, as we share new and ongoing inclusive and diverse projects to inspire digital makers in Hull.

#NWED is a celebration and a reminder of the projects and impact as we support school leaders and teachers to increase the participation of more girls in STEM fields and strategies to help close the gender gap.  Our own Ada Day follows on 30 June.

Immersive storytelling to support creativity in game making

We’ll be linking digital storytelling and literacy resources with the team from now>press>play to extend creative opportunities through programming.

We’re excited to be joined by Alice Lacey and Tom Owen, who will be facilitating activities and different kinds of learning experiences to use as a springboard into creative computing.  They’ll be engaging children through emotion, imagination and movement.

Join the auditory space journey that’ll lead to animation, game making and other digital activities using the resources from Code Club.

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Inspiring children through the Code Club network of after school clubs

If you’re looking to extend computing opportunities for children through your enrichment programme, then there’ll be lots of opportunities on the day to talk to Victoria Sauron about starting a Code Club in your school.  

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Victoria joins us at the North East and Yorkshire Coordinator for Code Club. As the children use the resources as examples of challenges available at the club sessions, you’ll be able to talk through how other schools have benefitted from the programme and what you can do to make it happen in your own school.

 

To join us on the day you’ll need to register for your free place, and select your workshops and time in the hackspace, on the link below.

Look forward to sharing those projects with you on the day!

 

Y4 children take on the ‘Scribblebot Challenge’ at Malet Lambert School for #GEWmakeit

This week we supported Malet Lambert School who hosted Hull Ready Hub’s first Enterprise Festival during Global Entrepreneurship Week.

The event focused on Hull as a City of Culture, Enterprising People, STEM and Digital, so we planned and delivered an activity used through the Research and Play project.

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Hull Ready Hub Enterprise Festival

We challenged the visiting Y4 children (over 200 of them!) to ‘design and build a robot that’ll draw it’s own work of art’.

They collaborated through a Scribblebot Challenge and worked in pairs to explore computational thinking as they built their robot.  At the end of each 20 minute maker session we shared what each robot had created.

Children developed creative circuits and explored complexity using variables such as motors, switches and artistic additions to their design. Ice-lolly sticks became a favourite design addition!

The secret to success came with identifying ‘failures’ and using design iterations to improve their final robot creation. 

Final robot masterpiece were definite STEM to STEAM masterpieces.

Full photo gallery here

Research and Play launches in Hull

Colleagues from Ashwell Academy, Malet Lambert, Northcott School, Sirius Academy, Thomas Ferens Academy, Tweendykes School and Winifred Holtby Academy collaborated last week to plan their first activities through Research and Play.

Watch this space to see how those projects develop as we explore computational thinking across the curriculum and get creative with electric paint, a Touchboard and a little or a lot of imagination.

In the meantime, we’re sharing ideas with some of the schools in Salford who have joined us for a bigger collaboration project linked with the Bare Conductive team.

Here’s a taster of what’s happening on the other side of the Pennines, until we showcase more of our extraordinary talents from Hull 🙂

Click to launch the blog

Click to launch the blog

Jam Packed Computing at Kingswood Academy

Kingswood Academy were hosts for the first Jam Packed Computing Festival in November 2014.

Many of you have asked for the links to resources used and also to share the download pages for the open source software used with families at the Hack Jam.

The Jam Packed website is now live and you’ll find all the links on the Teacher Toolkit page.   Have a look at the activities and challenges that students and teachers collaborated with too.  You’ll find them in the news section, along with reports from other festivals.

Look out too for more festivals coming up in the diary 🙂

jam packed logo

Click on the Jam Packed balloon to launch the website