Tag Archives: Coding

Next Hull Raspberry Jam: Saturday 22nd April

The next Raspberry Jam in Hull is at the Central Library on Saturday 22nd April.

Register for free tickets by clicking on the image below.  You’ll also find more information about Raspberry Jam.

Join us as we share, learn & tinker with digital making projects using Raspberry Pi.

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Under 16s need to be accompanied by an adult.

Everyone welcome – with or without a Raspberry Pi.  

Ada Lovelace Day in Hull: Inspiring and engaging young people to increase participation of girls in computing

Teachers and Y7 students joined us from across the city to collaborate on creative physical computing projects and explore careers in STEM.

Aims of the day:

  • To support the participation of more girls in computing and strategies to help close the gender gap in STEM fields.
  • To challenge and influence perceptions of computing with positive role models
  • To share creative opportunities through physical computing as a wearable tech STEAM projects (art, textiles, design etc.)
  • To support teachers with networking and collaborative opportunities

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We used the WISE Campaign’s People Like Me resources to explore personal strengths and aspirations and also to find out more about careers in STEM.

Language considerations opened up conversations and  thoughts on future possibilities, and for some adults a reassurance of their career choice in an instructor/teacher role.  Yes, we were all involved 🙂

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Students worked in pairs to start their projects through design-thinking, which meant sketching ideas and thoughts after initially coding and downloading a starter activity onto Codebugs.

The project brief was theirs to personalise and consider their own purpose and levels of complexity.  Support with ideas came with peer coaching and an array of resources to invent a wearable technology solution to their real life problem – or purpose.

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Lights, sound, tunes and messages were coded and then incorporated into their digital making projects.  Several iterations later and they were able to share their inventions, models and textile-based creations.

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Feedback from the students?

  • Computing activities can be complex and frustrating. But once you understand how to control it, it will become easier.
  • I found the part when we designed our inventions on the piece of paper exciting because it required us to discuss and think about what we were going to do.
  • I liked sewing the project together because it was challenging.
  • I found the designing exciting because we used our own ideas.
  • I liked making the project because it was fun and creative.
  • I liked exploring different ideas of computer science.
  • The activity was hard and frustrating at times but when you finally complete the activity, you feel really good and satisfied.
  • Making the project was interesting.

And how did they describe the digital making activities?

  • Fun and interesting!
  • Hard, different, fun and I would do it again
  • Wasn’t as I expected
  • I think that it was challenging and was fun
  • Interesting yet difficult
  • I found it tricky on some things but near the end it was fun and easy because I like to be creative and make/build things

Thanks to Winifred Holtby Academy, who became part of the planning cycle from the beginning, and sparked more interest in students to form future Lego challenge teams.

Inspiring the next generation of digital makers in Hull

Background

We’re thrilled that the number of creative computing projects that we’re supporting in schools has increased again this year.

That also means that the hackspace at our Tech 4 Change conference extends as a showcase for teachers and children to share, collaborate and network through challenges.

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Themes and partners

We’re inviting teachers to join us in Hull, on Thursday 23 June, as we explore peer to peer learning projects and reflect on the impact of digital making activities across the curriculum.

  • Are you co-ordinating the computing curriculum in your school and looking to incorporate new ideas for Computer Science, IT or Digital Literacy?
  • Thinking about transition projects and progression of programming from KS2 to KS3?
  • Planning enrichment activities and involving parents and carers with STEM clubs and Code Club?
  • Are you an art or music specialist and looking to incorporate technology into your projects as a ‘STEM to STEAM’ activity?
  • Looking to explore the language and terminology of the curriculum and plan creative activities?
  • Would you like support to ensure that the requirements for the Computing programme of study are met in your school?
  • Want to discuss ways to underpin the curriculum with computational thinking?

Children from Years 5, 7 and 8 will be working through challenges as they explore creative and imaginative possibilities through physical computing and programming.

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They’ll be working with a team of passionate educators who’ll also be on hand to talk about your own plans for activities in school.  Here’s a taster of digital making activities and partners who’ll be with us in the hackspace on the day:

Making sense of sensors and programming possibilities with BBC micro:bit

We’re delighted as David Whale joins us and the children get hands-on with creative activities from the IET’s (Institute of Engineering and Technology) Faraday Challenge with micro:bit.

David joins us as a software developer, STEM Ambassador and volunteer with the IET, who has worked with the project from the early days to develop resources and liaise with schools.

We’ll be using the IET challenges and no doubt the children will add their individual creative twists with their iterations and plans!

  • Are you waiting in anticipation for a delivery of your students’ BBC micro:bit devices and want to talk to others about first projects?
  • Wondering about the potential of this micro:bit that’ll be given to this year’s Year 7 groups, and how to sustain their interests and ambitions?
  • Thinking about how to use the micro:bit to support STEM clubs and parental engagement activities through events back in school?
  • Or are you one of the schools that we’ve been supporting with your recent delivery of boxes and curriculum plans, and want to extend complexities and projects?

Join us with your own plans or questions to explore : )

Inspiring young makers on National Women in Engineering Day (#NWED)

It’s no surprise that we’ve chosen 23 June as the conference date, as we share new and ongoing inclusive and diverse projects to inspire digital makers in Hull.

#NWED is a celebration and a reminder of the projects and impact as we support school leaders and teachers to increase the participation of more girls in STEM fields and strategies to help close the gender gap.  Our own Ada Day follows on 30 June.

Immersive storytelling to support creativity in game making

We’ll be linking digital storytelling and literacy resources with the team from now>press>play to extend creative opportunities through programming.

We’re excited to be joined by Alice Lacey and Tom Owen, who will be facilitating activities and different kinds of learning experiences to use as a springboard into creative computing.  They’ll be engaging children through emotion, imagination and movement.

Join the auditory space journey that’ll lead to animation, game making and other digital activities using the resources from Code Club.

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Inspiring children through the Code Club network of after school clubs

If you’re looking to extend computing opportunities for children through your enrichment programme, then there’ll be lots of opportunities on the day to talk to Victoria Sauron about starting a Code Club in your school.  

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Victoria joins us at the North East and Yorkshire Coordinator for Code Club. As the children use the resources as examples of challenges available at the club sessions, you’ll be able to talk through how other schools have benefitted from the programme and what you can do to make it happen in your own school.

 

To join us on the day you’ll need to register for your free place, and select your workshops and time in the hackspace, on the link below.

Look forward to sharing those projects with you on the day!

 

Ada Day: Thursday 30th June

Ada Lovelace Day in Hull: An event to inspire the next generation of digital makers and support an increased participation of girls in computing

Invitations have now arrived in schools for a day of creative and collaborative digital making challenges with career connections at Winifred Holtby Academy on Thursday 30th June.

This event aims to encourage Y7 girls to explore physical computing and e-textiles through social and hands-on learning activities.

We’ll be using resources and activities from the WISE Campaign’s People Like Me project and collaborating with STEM Ambassadors through a range of hands-on challenges.

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Wearable inventions

Event aims:

  • To support the participation of more girls in computing and strategies to help close the gender gap in STEM fields.
  • To challenge and influence perceptions of computing with positive role models
  • To share creative opportunities through physical computing as a wearable tech STEAM projects (art, textiles, design etc.)
  • To support teachers with networking and collaborative opportunities
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Peer to peer learning

Look out for more opportunities with peer to peer learning activities and community digital-themed events across the city of Hull.

‘Made in Hull’ algorithms for 2017

What happens when you introduce a project for pupils to design, build and test an algorithm to share a local story to visitors about Hull?

Oh, and they have to wear their code with pride.  That’s because their messages need to be digitally displayed on a wearable tech device called a Codebug.

That was the challenge set by the Hull 2017 team and RM Education to a group of digital leaders from Spring Cottage and Malet Lambert schools.  Collaborating across Y5, 7 & 8, they worked in teams to design and communicate their stories. All part of events organised during National Careers Week.

An afternoon of creativity and fun (according to some) turned into problem solving and teamwork as the children tackled errors through their complexities.  Confident coding led to serious debugging tasks and in turn to successful projects shared.

Code Orange 🙂

Initial ideas at the 2 schools were shared in the small new teams and further projects extended and developed during the session.

 

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Testing and debugging

It became evident to the groups that coding as a trio could lead to more ambitious outcomes once everybody’s ideas and skills were considered.  Whatever their age and if they had, or hadn’t in this case, worked together before.

What did the children enjoy about the project?

  • How we got to code with different people I didn’t know
  • I liked all the coding that we had to do and all the debugs we had to do
  • The girl who came from Malet Lambert let us decide
  • That we had to work together
  • Working as a team
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Made in Code

And what about collaborating with students from another school?

  • That we work good in a group and we have more ideas
  • That at different schools they learn different things about coding
  • That it is fun to learn with other people
  • You can collaborate vary well with someone you haven’t met before
  • How to tell people how to do things!!
  • THAT YOU STILL USE CODING AT BIG SCHOOL AND ITS NOT AS CONFUSING AND HARD AS IT LOOKS AND YOU MUST ALWAYS HAVE A GO
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Team Smile

What did the children learn during the project?

  • That debugging is easier than I thought
  • How to make code more thoroughly
  • That you can wear your code
  • That you can do so many things with one tiny piece of technology
  • Teamwork

 

 

 

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Sharing stories  

 

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Wearables for wearables

Team photos were taken with a Raspberry Pi project as we continued the planning conversations about possibilities with inputs and outputs.

Smile : )

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Physical Computing with Codebug: Coding Progression? Wearable tech? Creative Computing?

Since the BBC’s announcement that their Microbit programmable device would be heading to all Year 7 students in September, we’ve been looking to support those requests coming through from teachers wishing to explore progression, plan ahead and often just familiarisation time with the device.

The Research and Play project has given us the opportunity to incorporate physical computing projects across the curriculum and to engage with teachers from many subject areas.

And this term we prioritised time to support using a programmable device called Codebug.

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                                                      First Challenge

A group of Year 10 scientists and digital leaders designing projects using Raspberry Pi extended their repertoire of computing devices and experiences this week as I asked them to explore the Codebug.

That would give further insights to share at yesterday’s Education Impact meeting with teachers from across the city.

Introducing Codebug

                             Introducing Codebug

And what is it?

It can be used as an introduction to physical computing and electronics or it could be a springboard for those students, like this group, who have experience of programming and who very quickly started to share ideas about what next in a hack way.

It’s versatility as a connected device via USB or coin battery meant wearable technology projects became a whole lot more simple.  And ideas for this output became a whole lot more creative!

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                          Online software

Fundamentally the 2 components are the online software tool, which is drag and drop programming, and the physical device itself.   Students are able to log in and start a project or take another idea and remix for themselves; very much play-hack-share.

This also gives students the chance to continue to create, plan, extend, develop and debug from home or school.

And feedback as this group shared ideas and thoughts after a half hour familiarisation session?

Well for the teachers, hearing that half hour timeframe to plug in, explore, program, connect, download, share, and review was pivotal.  This group have got experience of programming projects already, but so will Year 6 students arriving at school in September.

For a couple of our schools Computing has been incorporated into their Transition Week and we have a set of Codebugs to share with that scenario.

Looking at impact throughout those weeks and beyond is an obvious focus and mapping progression of programming through these projects is a current activity, and one that teachers requested for this Summer term.

Play-Hack-Share

                                        Play-Hack-Share 

And in the meantime?  The students continue to develop and share ideas until our teachers collaborate next week at the CPD Conference in Hull.

Hackspace ideas feeding into transition and curriculum planning?

Research and Play: Breathing new life into Photosynthesis

Research and Play just got more creative as a set of Y10 Scientists from The Kingswood Academy join our project.

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                            Research and Play

The school have been exploring circuits with Bare Conductive’s electric paint and developing investigations with Raspberry Pi for over a year now, so we’re thrilled that this group can join us to share ideas at the Technology for Change conference on Tuesday 7th July.

They’ve already started to plan projects to bring along on the day and, along with their own teacher,  will invite others to join them and collaborate to develop further ideas in the live hackspace.  Activities will include:

  • Getting creative with capacitive touch using electric paint and Touchboard (ideas below)
  • Developing games and controlling devices using Makey Makey
  • Exploring and designing personalised ‘wearable tech’ using Codebug
  • Using Sonic Pi as a visualisation tool to code musical compositions with scientific data
  • Racing Cannybots as another way to explore contextual modelling
  • Collecting health data and looking at creative visualisation possibilities with the Young Pioneers
  • Getting creative (and possibly slightly mischievous) with Raspberry Pi and Pi-Cam project possibilities

Ideas to share as a taster before the conference?

This week the students have been finalising capacitive touch projects which are focused on creating resources and models to support revision.  Groups have each selected their own topic from their Y10 course.

One group has taken the electromagnetic spectrum as it’s stimulus; another space and planets.

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                   Revision notes as a starting point 

The group looking to add ‘modern learning’ (their words) to breath new life into Photosynthesis have been investigating ways to explain areas and share learning tips.

Their ideas have a waft of reminiscence from the BBC Adventure Game (circa 1986…eek) as they take a song, a plant and some nail varnish as core elements to design and create their model.

This time it’s not the BBC Microcomputer but a Touchboard that’s launching their interactive designs.  And the plant will need to be more sturdy than an aspidistra if it’s to hold up to paint and clips : )

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      An aspidistra, nail varnish and a tune

Did you know that the pilot show for Adventure Game included a planned activity using salt water to conduct electricity?  It was pulled.  How times change……

Hope you can join us to find out more about how Research and Play is supporting teachers across the curriculum through creative computing projects.  You can register here for your free ticket.